Deconstructed Chicken Pot Pie

After a two week holiday in warm and sunny Florida, my husband and I returned to our home in New Hampshire where we were greeted with 30 inches of snow on the ground. When temperatures are below freezing and it is snowing outside, who wouldn’t like A Deconstructed Chicken Pot Pie. Moist, tender chicken and colorful vegetables are mixed in a creamy, flavorful sauce and served with a flakey herbed pastry alongside for a comforting meal. This warm and satisfying dish will make you forget about the nasty weather just outside your door.

Deconstructed Chicken Pot Pie

Deconstructed Chicken Pot Pie

Upon returning home from a vacation, my cupboards can be pretty bare. Add a snowy day to the situation and I need to prepare a meal from ingredients that I have on hand in my refrigerator, freezer and pantry. For this delicious chicken pot pie, I poached boneless, skinless chicken thighs that I had in my freezer in a flavorful broth made from fat-free canned chicken stock and herbs from the windowsill. I used pearl onions and tiny green peas from my freezer, carrots and a couple of potatoes from my vegetable baskets stored in my root cellar in the basement. For the savory pie crust wedges that complete the dish, I used pie crust dough that I had in the freezer.

Deconstructed Chicken Pot Pie

Recipe serves 2 generously, adjust accordingly

Savory Pie Crust Wedges 

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.

  • a single pie crust, your favorite recipe or a ready-made refrigerated crust
  • 1 tsp. fresh thyme leaves, chopped
  • 1 tsp. fresh rosemary leaves, chopped
  • 1/2 tsp. sea salt flakes or to taste
  • freshly ground black pepper

Roll the pie dough between plastic wrap until it is 1/4 inch thick. Sprinkle the dough with herbs, sea salt, and pepper and roll until 1/8 inch thick. Place on a baking sheet and brush with a little cream, if desired. Cut the crust into wedges with a pastry cutter and bake for 10 to 12 minutes until golden brown, then cool on a rack. Can be made ahead of time.

Filling

Poaching liquid made with 2 c. chicken broth, 1 bay leaf, a couple of sprigs of fresh thyme and parsley, 2 cloves garlic, smashed, and 1/2 c. white wine and water, if needed.

  • 3 boneless, skinless chicken thighs (2 8 oz. boneless chicken breasts, may be used)
  • 1/4 c. cream
  • 3 Tbsp. butter
  • 3 Tbsp. flour (I use Wondra)
  • 2 small carrots, peeled, cut into 1/2 inch pieces
  • 2 small yukon gold potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2 inch cubes
  • 1/2 c. frozen pearl onions
  • 1/2 c. frozen baby peas
  • 1/4 tsp. lemon juice
  • salt and pepper to taste

Put the ingredients for the poaching liquid into a small pan that will hold the chicken in a single layer, then add the chicken thighs. Add water, if necessary, so that the chicken is covered by one inch of liquid. Bring to a simmer over low heat, simmer the chicken uncovered for 7 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat, cover and let stand for 10 minutes until the chicken is opaque throughout. Cut a piece in half and if pink inside, return to heat and simmer for 2 additional minutes. Let chicken cool in broth. When the chicken is cool enough to handle, remove from the broth, cut into bite size pieces and set aside in a bowl.

Add the carrots, potatoes and pearl onions to the broth and cook until barely tender. Strain the broth into a bowl, adding the vegetables to the bowl with the chicken.

Heat the butter in a pan and then add the flour. Whisk until blended and cook for about 2 minutes until you have a blonde roux. Slowly pour in the reserved broth, whisking until smooth and simmer until thickened. Add the chicken, vegetables, frozen peas, cream, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Gently stir until everything is heated through. If the sauce becomes too thick, thin with a little milk or cream.  Ladle into bowls and serve with the savory pie crust wedges.

****

The deconstructed chicken pot pie is very different from the store-bought frozen chicken pot pies that you might have grown up eating. My husband and I both love the fact that the savory pie crust wedges stay crisp and flakey by being baked separately and served on top. Of course, you could put the filling into a casserole dish, top with the savory pie crust  and bake in the oven until the crust is golden.

This warming and savory pot pie is a complete meal in a bowl.  The dish is pure comfort food that made us forget about the cold and snow for a little while. Now if only the temperatures would warm up enough to melt all the snow on the ground…that would be really comforting.

Over Thirty Inches Of Snow On The Ground

Over Thirty Inches Of Snow On The Ground At Our New Hampshire Home

I would love to know what your favorite comfort dish is that makes you forget about the miserable weather outside your door in the winter.

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Carolina Inspired Pulled Pork Sandwich

Juicy, melt in your mouth pork is wonderful served as part of a main meal but it also makes a great sandwich. Inspired by the pulled pork sandwiches I enjoyed in South Carolina during a road trip two years ago, I used pork shoulder that was braised with beer and onions in a slow cooker, then shredded to make my version of a Carolina pulled pork sandwich.

Carolina Pulled Pork Sandwich With Coleslaw And Beans

Carolina Pulled Pork Sandwich With Coleslaw And Beans

If you travel between North and South Carolina or even east to west in either state, you will come across different versions of pulled pork sandwiches. In some areas, the whole pig is slowly smoked, then chopped and mixed together. In other areas, just the pork shoulder is smoked for sandwiches. Even the sauce varies from region to region.

In some parts of the Carolinas, pulled pork sandwiches will be made with a very thin vinegar and red chili flake sauce. In other sections of the states, the sandwiches will be prepared with a tomato and mustard based sauce. If you travel in other parts of the US and order a pulled pork sandwich, you will probably encounter one prepared with a thick, sweet sauce.

The sandwich I enjoyed the most while traveling in South Carolina was prepared with a thin vinegary mustard and brown sugar sauce that was full of flavor but still let the taste of the pork come through.

Carolina Inspired Pulled Pork Sandwich

Serves 4, adjust the recipe accordingly

Carolina Style BBQ Sauce (makes about 1 cup sauce)

  • 1/2 c. mustard
  • 3 Tbsp. cider vinegar
  • 2 Tbsp. water
  • 1 Tbsp. butter
  • 3 Tbsp. brown sugar
  • 3 Tbsp. sugar
  • 1 tsp. ancho chili powder
  • 1 tsp. chipotle chili powder
  • 1 tsp. smoked paprika
  • 1 tsp. black pepper
  • 1/8 tsp. cayenne pepper
  • 1/4 tsp. soy sauce
  • Optional ingredient – a tsp. or two of liquid smoke can be added for a smoky flavor but I don’t think it is necessary

Mix all the ingredients together in a small sauce pan and simmer for about 10 minutes.

  •  pulled pork (Recipe for beer braised pork can be found here)                                        I used about 4 cups of the shredded pork to prepare four sandwiches
  • buttered and toasted buns

Add the pulled pork to the BBQ sauce in the pan and simmer until heated through.

Place meat on a buttered and toasted bun and serve.

****

A lot of people in the Carolinas like their pulled pork sandwiches topped with coleslaw. Since I grew up in Texas where a sandwich is all about the meat, I served the coleslaw on the side along with a slice of sweet red onion, dill pickle chips and spicy ranch beans. While on the subject of Texas, if you order a BBQ sandwich there it is often prepared with smoked beef brisket that is sliced or chopped. The meat is usually served plain on the bun with a choice of sauces served on the side.

Whether you like a pulled pork sandwich with a tangy vinegar and mustard based sauce or prefer one that is prepared with a thick sweet sauce, one thing I believe we can all agree on is that slowly braised pork makes for a mouthwatering dish. A pork shoulder is usually large enough to provide enough meat for more than one meal. I cooked a four pound pork shoulder for two people. There was enough meat to not only prepare the sandwiches but pork tacos as well. I also had  plenty of pork left to create a third dish which I will share with you at a later date.

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Florida, The Sunshine State

Each year my husband and I leave the snow and cold of New England and head to Florida, The Sunshine State. If you read my post Winter White Is Fashionable, you will remember that our home and apple orchard was covered in deep snow. Since that time, we have received more than a foot and a half of snow with more on the way. We turned over the snow plowing and shoveling to our caretaker and boarded a flight south. How delightful it was to arrive at our favorite boutique hotel, The Pillars located in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. (You can click on the link to see photos from our previous stay.)  The hotel is located on the Intercoastal Waterway. This area of Ft. Lauderdale is known as the “Venice of America” because of all the canals with multimillion dollar homes, yacht clubs, and outdoor waterfront dining.

Enjoy The Warmth Of The Sun, The Shade Of The Palms, And Tropical Breezes

Enjoy The Warmth Of The Sun, The Shade Of The Palms, And Tropical Breezes

Orchids In The Poolside Gardens

Orchids In The Poolside Gardens

It took mere minutes to change out of the sweaters we had worn to the airport in Boston and into our bathing suits. We are spending a few days enjoying the warmth of the sun, the shade of the palm trees and the tropical breezes. Hopefully by the time we return home to New Hampshire, our pasty white bodies will have developed a lovely tan and will be a nice souvenir of our time spent in Florida.

Breakfast On The Dock

Breakfast On The Dock

Each day has begun with breakfast on the dock as we watch yachts, one bigger than the next, make their way down the Intercoastal Waterway. Across the water from the hotel there is a huge home but as you can see from the photos of the yachts passing by, it seems to be dwarfed by the size of the mega yachts.

Multimillion Dollar Home On The Intercoastal Waterway And The Owner's Yacht

Multimillion Dollar Home On The Intercoastal Waterway And The Owner’s Yacht

In Case You Are In a Hurry, A Helicopter Is Handy To Have On Board Your Yacht

In Case You Are In a Hurry, A Helicopter Is Handy To Have On Board Your Yacht

Perhaps You Want A Sightly Bigger Yacht

Perhaps You Want Something Sightly Bigger For Entertaining

We celebrated our anniversary one night having dinner dockside at the hotel watching the sun set while we sipped a glass of champagne.

Sunset Dinner On The Dock

Sunset Dinner On The Dock

Several evenings were spent enjoying some of the better known and trendy restaurants such as YOLO (You Only Live Once), Truluck’s and Market 17, all located in Fort Lauderdale. Market 17′s food enticed us back for a second meal which is a rarity.

Mixologist Luke Tullos

Mixologist Luke Tullos

Arriving at Market 17 early, we started the evening at the bar with specialty cocktails prepared by mixologist Luke Tullos.

Remember The Maine, Hemingway’s Daiquiri and Canadian Royalty were made with fresh fruit juices and hand crafted small batch spirits.

Remember The Maine Cocktail

Remember The Maine Cocktail

While at the bar, we shared a selection of house made charcuterie. We chose a plate of smoked duck ham, rosemary & olive sausage, ginger walnut salami, guanciale, black peppercorn infused blue cheese, accompanied by house made chutney, mustard, pickled vegetables, almonds and olives.

Housemade Charcuterie With Smoked Duck Ham, Rosemary & Olive Sausage, Etc. With Chutneys, Cheese, Almonds And Olives

Housemade Charcuterie With Smoked Duck Ham, Rosemary & Olive Sausage, Etc. With Chutneys, Cheese, Almonds And Olives

Key West Shrimp With Wild Rice, Brussels Sprouts, And Piquillo Pepper Aioli

Key West Shrimp With Wild Rice, Brussels Sprouts, Grilled Corn And Piquillo And Alepo Pepper Aioli

Key West Shrimp with wild rice, roasted Brussels sprouts, grilled corn and piquillo pepper and alepo aioli was one of the delicious entrees we enjoyed.

Poolside At The Pillars Hotel

Poolside At The Pillars Hotel

As much as we hate to leave our lovely little hotel with its beautiful tropical gardens, we are now heading out to the suburbs near the Everglades where we will spend the rest of our vacation visiting with our family. Meals will be enjoyed at family restaurants with about a dozen of us gathered around the tables. We will be reminiscing about our time spent living in south Florida with our children, playing cards, and enjoying the antics of our grandchildren.

Since I’ll be a little busy with family, please understand if I don’t get to visit with all my readers until we head back to New Hampshire. Don’t be too jealous of us enjoying some warm weather as we are supposed to have snow the day before we fly home. I’ll have to start shoveling snow before I know it.

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Pulled Pork Tacos

Pork, beer, and onions…did I get your attention. A pork shoulder is braised with beer and onions in a slow cooker, then shredded to make Pulled Pork Tacos. You will have plenty of meat to make tacos to feed your family but also enough fork tender pork left to use in several other dishes that I will be sharing with you in future posts.

Beer Braised Pulled Pork Tacos

Beer Braised Pulled Pork Tacos

I think everyone enjoys a taco night at home once in a while. If you are one of the few people who don’t like tacos but enjoy Mexican food, you can use the pulled pork recipe as an ingredient in other dishes such as enchiladas, burritos or nachos.

The beer braised pork shoulder used in the tacos is super simple to make. The meat only requires seasoning, searing, and then it is put into a slow cooker on a bed of sliced onions. A bottle of your favorite beer is poured around it.  The pork is left to simmer low and slow in the slow cooker until can be pulled apart with a fork. After the pork is shredded, the portion you wish to use for tacos is heated with some of the braising liquid and tomatillo salsa. Place the rest of the meat in airtight containers and refrigerate or freeze for future use. The broth can be strained, fat skimmed when cool and frozen for future use.

The wonderful thing about using a slow cooker is that you can start it in the morning, walk away and it basically cooks itself. If you don’t have a slow cooker, the pork can be simmered slowly on the stove top but will need some watching. If you like crispy brown bits, the oven is another alternative for preparing the pork and you can use my recipe for Cuban pork.

Pulled Pork Tacos

Beer Braised Pork

  • 1 boneless pork shoulder also known as pork butt or Boston butt, fat trimmed if necessary (approx. 4 lb.)
  • a spice rub made with 1/2 tsp. each of cumin, smoked paprika, onion powder, garlic powder, salt, black pepper and dark brown sugar, 1/4 tsp. cayenne (the spices and quantities can be adjusted to suit your taste)
  • 1 – 2 Tbsp. oil
  • 1 large onion, sliced
  • 4 or 5 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 bottle beer (I used Dos Equis Amber)
  • 1/2 c. – 1 c. roasted tomatillo salsa, see recipe below or use store bought salsa (Santa Clara or Frontera are good brands that I have used)

Place sliced onions and garlic in the bottom of a slow cooker. Massage the spice rub into the pork. Heat oil in a sauté pan and sear the pork on all sides.  Place pork on the bed of onions in the slow cooker. Deglaze the pan with the beer then pour around the pork, cover and start the slow cooker. It will probably take 6 hours on high or 8 hours on low, depending on your slow cooker and the size of the pork, be tender enough to pull apart with a fork.

Remove the pork to a platter and let cool enough to handle. While cooling, stain the cooking liquid, discarding the onions and garlic. When cool, skim the fat and save the broth. Once the pork has cooled, pull apart with a fork, discarding any fat.

Heat the shredded pork with the salsa and enough broth to moisten.

Roasted Tomatillo Salsa

  • 4 tomatillos, papery skin removed, and halved
  • 1 onion quartered
  • 2 serrano chilies, halved and seeded
  • 2 large garlic cloves
  • a handful of cilantro, thick stems removed
  • 1/4 c. water
  • 1/2 tsp. salt and pepper
  • 1 Tbsp. olive oil

Place tomatillos, onions, chilies and garlic cloves on a foil lined baking sheet and place 4 inches under the broiler and cook until softened and starting to get a few black spots, about 5 minutes, stir and cook for another 3 to 5 minutes.  When cooked, place in a food processor with the water and oil, blend until a salsa consistency. Season with salt and pepper.

Warm Tortillas and Condiments of your choice such as shredded cabbage, chopped onions, sliced radishes, chopped tomatoes, guacamole, pico de gallo, tomatillo salsa, crumbled quesco fresco, cilantro, Mexican crema, and sour cream.

Assemble tacos and serve.

****

The beer braised pork is succulent, delicious and melts in your mouth. Piled high on a warm corn tortilla and topped with your favorite condiments, you have a total meal in one little package that you can enjoy with your family and friends.  If you would like to serve an alternative to meat, you can find my recipe for fish tacos here. All you need are some cold beers or  margaritas and you have the makings of a party. Delicioso!

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Winter White Is Fashionable

Every one knows the old saying that “you should never wear white after Labor Day”, but that isn’t the case anymore. The softer shade of Winter White Is Fashionable and can be seen everywhere for the past several years. You can dress from head to toe in this trendy color or just choose one item as a fashion statement. Here in New England, nature has dressed the landscape in what can definitely be called winter white.

Looking Out At The Front Orchard Covered In Thick Wet Snow

Thick Wet Snow Covers The Trees Creating A Beautiful Winter Landscape

A Gray Day In New England Looks Like A Black And White Photo

A Gray Day In New England Looks Like A Black And White Photo

The Smallest Of Branches Hold Wet Sticky Snow

The Smallest Of Branches Hold Wet Sticky Snow

The lack of sun creates what appears to be a black and white world. Although I’m not a great photographer and the photos are not taken in black and white, these photos remind me of the wonderful black and white photography of Ansel Adams. You have to look closely to see that the pine needles are still green and the trunks of the trees are various shades of brown.

You Need To Look Closely To See The Color

You Need To Look Closely To See The Color

Windows can get coated with snow and frost that obscures the view of the outdoors. The designs are so beautiful that you don’t seem to mind that the light is dulled inside. I enjoy watching as the patterns change during the day, some remind me of frozen ferns.

Frosted Window Pane

Frosted Window Pane

Frost Obscures The Light And View Outdoors  But The Patterns Are Beautiful

Frost Obscures The Light And View Outdoors But The Patterns Are Beautiful

Icicles form along the edges of the roof when the temperatures start to rise and the sun is shining. All the dripping during the day causes the icicles to grow longer and eventually they cover parts of the windows. When the sun shines on them, they look like Baccarat crystals. Eventually their own weight causes them to fall but until then they are beautiful.

Icicles Shine Like Baccarat Crystals Decorating The Windows

Icicles Shine Like Baccarat Crystals Decorating The Windows

The few items that are not covered with white snow add a pop of color. Interior decorators like to do much the same thing by adding a punch of color to a monochromatic room to make a bold statement.

Red Winter Berries Seem To Glow Against The Snow

Red Winter Berries Seem To Glow Against The Snow

The Stage Coach Red Door Seems Warm In The Cold Enviorment

The Stage Coach Red Door Seems To Add Warmth To The Cold Environment

Our yellow home always looks welcoming in the winter, even after a large snow storm.

After looking at the landscape covered in white, I realize that we can dress much the same way as nature. We can wear winter white from head to toe and have a classic look or we can wear a winter white outfit and add a colorful accessory to make a fashion statement.

"Should we being wearing white?…don't worry, we are wearing winter white"

“Should we being wearing white? Don’t worry, we are wearing winter white…it is very fashionable.”

So when you ask yourself if you should wear white after Labor Day, just dress in winter white…it is very fashionable. Tell me, do you wear white throughout the year or only during the warm months?

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Caldo Verde, A Portuguese Kale Soup

Caldo Verde, A Portuguese Kale Soup is a healthy, hearty and delicious tasting dish. While kale has become a trendy green, touted in recent years because of its many health benefits, families in Portugal have eaten this green for hundreds of years. Caldo Verde is served not only as a simple meal at kitchen tables but also at catered weddings held in elegant surroundings and is regarded by many to be the national dish of Portugal.

Caldo Verde, Portuguese Kale Soup

Caldo Verde, Portuguese Kale Soup

As is typical with many traditional dishes, Caldo Verde, which translates to “green broth”, has many variations. In its simplest form, this soup is made with collards which are known as “couve” or kale, potatoes, olive oil, salt and water. In heartier versions, it is cooked with stock and Portuguese sausage such as linguica or chourico. The sausage can be added to the soup or served sliced on the side of the dish.

Caldo Verde, Portuguese Kale Soup

Serves 4

  •  1/2 lb. Portuguese chourico or linguica sausage
  • 1 Tbsp. olive oil plus additional 2 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 4 to 5 garlic cloves, minced
  • 3 c. cubed potatoes (2 large)
  • 2 c. chicken broth
  • 2 c. water
  • 3/4 tsp. salt or to taste
  • 3/4 tsp. pepper
  • 1/4 tsp. or more red pepper flakes
  • 4 c. finely chopped kale (thick stems removed)

Cut the sausage in half and set one half aside. Cut the other half into bite size pieces. In a large pot, heat 1 Tbsp. oil over medium heat and brown the sausage pieces. Remove the sausage with a slotted spoon and reserve. Add the additional 2 Tbsp. of oil to the pot, add the onions and sauté until soft and translucent. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add the potatoes, broth, water and seasonings along with the large piece of sausage to the pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer until the potatoes are tender.  Remove the large piece of sausage to a plate. When cool enough to handle, cut into 1/4 inch slices and keep warm.  Blend the soup with a stick blender until smooth. If too thick, thin with a little broth or water. Add the chopped kale and the bite size pieces of sausage to the soup and cook until the kale is tender, about 5 to 10 minutes. Be careful not to over cook the kale to retain its bright green color. Taste the soup, adjusting the seasonings, if necessary. Ladle the soup into bowls and place a couple of sausage slices on top and serve.

****

After enjoying this wonderful soup, I can understand why everyone in Portugal loves Caldo Verde and consider it their national dish. A steaming bowl of this flavorful and hearty soup is perfect for a damp or cold day. Adding the fact that this nourishing soup is made with kale, known for being high in fiber, calcium, and antioxidants and low in calories, I could eat this healthy soup every day. It is a complete meal in a bowl. The only thing you need is a piece of crusty bread to wipe the bowl clean.

While I made this soup with sausage and chicken broth, Caldo Verde can easily be prepared as a vegetarian, vegan or gluten free soup by making easy adjustments. Enjoy!

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Chicken And Sausage Gumbo, A Louisiana Specialty

Chicken And Sausage Gumbo is a Louisiana specialty that will tantalize your taste buds. When I visit the historic city of New Orleans, I like to explore the diverse culinary offerings found throughout the French Quarter, the Garden District and the trendy Warehouse District. Whether at one of the city’s famous restaurants or a small mom and pop owned cafe, I must have at least one bowl of gumbo during my stay.

Walk down the streets in the French Quarter and you will find people standing in front of restaurants trying to get you to go in and try their “authentic” Cajun or Creole food. The truth is when it comes to “authentic” gumbo, there are as many variations as there are mommas who cook it. This long simmered stew reflects a melting pot of African, French, Spanish, Native American and other nationalities that have lived in this intriguing port city over hundreds of years. The ingredients that cooks used to make their gumbo were what they happened to have available during the different seasons of the year.

When fresh seafood was plentiful, a gumbo might have been filled will shrimp, crabs and oysters. At other times of the year, duck or rabbit might have been in the pot. One of the popular gumbos found throughout the year, was made with chicken and smoked sausage.

Chicken And Sausage Gumbo

Chicken And Sausage Gumbo

The most important step when making any kind of gumbo is Preparing A Roux. Preparing a roux for gumbo is a different process than one used when making a white gravy or sauce. I make mine with equal parts of oil and flour, whisking over medium high heat until it is combined. I then turn the heat down to medium and cook, stirring constantly, so that it doesn’t burn. I like the roux to reach a color similar to a copper penny or peanut butter. This will take about 30 minutes. Some cooks like their roux to be the color of dark chocolate and that will take longer, up to an hour total.  A deep colored roux is what is going to make a successful gumbo. There is also a technique for making a roux in the oven but I always prepare mine the conventional way.

Chicken And Sausage Gumbo

Serves 2 generously. For this recipe, use a ratio of approximately 3 Tbsp. of oil and 3 Tbsp. of flour to make the roux. If you are preparing a larger quantity of this recipe, just increase the amounts but keep the same ratio.

  • 3 Tbsp. flour
  • 3 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 4 thick cut slices of smoked bacon, diced
  • 2 boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut into bite size pieces
  • 1 link (approximately 1/2 lb.) andouille sausage, sliced 1/4 inch thick (if unavailable, other smoked sausage such as kielbasa or Portuguese chourico can be substituted)
  • 3 stalks of celery, diced
  • 1 onion, sliced into bite size pieces
  • 1 bell pepper, stemmed, seeded, and sliced into bite size pieces
  • 3 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 4 c. chicken stock
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 tsp. thyme, more if using fresh
  • 1 tsp. basil
  • 1/2 tsp. allspice
  • salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 1/2 tsp. Tabasco
  • 1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce

In a saucepan, heat the 3 Tbsp. of oil. Add the flour, whisk to make the roux. Cook, stirring constantly until the flour turns a dark brown, then set aside.

In a large heavy bottomed pot (cast-iron, if you have one), add the diced bacon and cook till done. Transfer to a plate, reserving the bacon fat. Add the chicken to the bacon fat and cook until lightly brown. Transfer the chicken to the plate with the bacon.  Add the sausage and cook for about 5 minutes. Drain all but 1 Tbsp. of  accumulated fat then add the celery, onion, and bell pepper and cook until soft. Add the garlic and cook for one minute. Add the stock, stirring to release any browned bits. Add the roux, spices, Tabasco and Worcestershire sauce and stir well. Simmer the gumbo for about 30 minutes until it thickens and the flavors have blended. Return the bacon and chicken to the pot and simmer for about 10 minutes. Taste and adjust the seasoning, if necessary, then serve. **Gumbo is usually ladled over a small amount of cooked white rice with Tabasco served on the side.

Gumbo Served With Rice And Tabasco On The Side

Chicken And Sausage Gumbo Served With Rice And Tabasco On The Side

Recipes have been created by cooks who try to please those for whom they are cooking. The recipe that I have developed for Louisiana chicken and sausage gumbo may not be considered an “authentic” version but my husband and I think it is delicious.  Serve this gumbo over a little white rice, along with some garlic French bread and a glass of wine or a cold beer and you will have a little taste of New Orleans in your own home. Enjoy!

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